Naples Cruise

An authentic Mediterranean port
Gateway to Pompeii
Delightful unspoiled old town

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Naples

The striking Angevin keep, symbol of the city

Naples is a large, sprawling Mediterranean port, with a centre that has many different focuses just waiting to be discovered on an MSC Mediterranean cruise excursion.

No trip to Naples is complete without visiting the area between Piazza Garibaldi and Via Toledo, roughly corresponding to the old Roman Neapolis (much of which is still unexcavated like in many other Italian cities).


The old part of Naples – the centro storico – is formed by the main streets of Via dei Tribunali and Via San Biagio dei Librai (the latter also known as “Spaccanapoli” as it literally splits Naples in two), which still follow the path of the ancient Roman roads. This is much the liveliest and most teeming part of Naples, an open-air kasbah of hawking, yelling humanity that makes up in energy what it lacks in grace. But it’s the city’s most intriguing quarter, and a must-see on any cruise to Naples. The Duomo is a Gothic building from the early thirteenth century (though with a late nineteenth-century neo-Gothic facade) dedicated to the patron saint of the city, San Gennaro


MSC Mediterranean cruises also offer excursions to Pompeii. One of Campania’s most important Roman commercial centres – a moneyed resort for wealthy patricians and a trading town that exported wine and fish – the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79 in effect froze the town’s way of life as it stood at the time.


Trips can also be taken to the island of Capri, place of legend, home to the mythical Sirens and a much-eulogized playground of the super-rich in the years since – though now it has settled down to a lucrative existence as a target for day-trippers from the mainland.

 

Definitely worth a visit, but these days the origins of much of the purple prose may be hard to find.

Must see places in Naples

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REACH THE PORT

Port of Naples

This section contains information on how to reach the port.

Cruise Terminal:

Stazione Marittima - Molo Beverello

Reach the port by

  • CAR

    From the A1 Milan to Naples motorway, take the A3 motorway in the direction signposted Naples and follow the signs to the port and Naples city centre. Leave at the exit signposted Naples City Centre. Arriving in Naples, take Via Marina. The port is opposite the Maschio Angioino and Piazza Municipio.
    On the A3 Salerno to Reggio Calabria motorway, travelling toward Naples, follow the signs for the port and Naples City Centre. Leave at the exit signposted Naples City Centre. Arriving in Naples, take Via Marina. The port is opposite the Maschio Angioino and Piazza Municipio.
    CAR

    Parking Information

    TERMINAL NAPOLI
     
    Molo Angioino Stazione Marittima - 80133 Naples
     
    Tel. +39 081 5514448 
     
     
    • Outdoor self service parking 
    • Reach the luggage drop off zone of the cruise terminal where you'll find the staff of the parking
    Book your parking with MSC

    park_and_cruise_logo

    VEHICLE DAYS RATES
    Car 8 € 90
    Suv 8 € 90
    Minivan 8 € 90


  • Train

    Naples Garibaldi Station is 3 km from the port, which is a 20-minute walk away or 7 minutes by taxi.  Bus services are also available.
    Mergellina Railway Station is 9 km from the main port and is served by taxi (journey approx. 25 minutes depending on traffic). 
    Campi Flegrei Railway Station is 6.5 Km away from the port and served by taxi.
    Train
  • Plane

    Capodichino Airport is about 7 km from the main port and is served by taxi and bus. The Alibus service makes only 2 stops (at Piazza Garibaldi and Piazza Municipio) and the fare is paid on board. The buses depart from just outside the arrivals exit.
    Plane

Italy

History, gastronomy and fashion
History, gastronomy and fashion

A cruise to Italy is an emotional roller coaster. Rome is a tremendous city quite unlike any other, and in terms of historical sights outstrips everywhere else in the country by some way.
 
Liguria, the small coastal province along the north-west coast, has long been known as the “Italian Riviera” and is accordingly crowded with sun-seekers for much of the summer.
In Veneto the main focus of interest is, of course, Venice: a unique city, and every bit as beautiful as its reputation would suggest. Tuscany in central Italy represents perhaps the most commonly perceived image of the country, with its classic rolling countryside and the art-packed towns of Florence and Pisa.

The south proper begins with the region of Campania. Its capital, Naples, is a unique, unforgettable city, the spiritual heart of the Italian south. Puglia, the “heel” of Italy, has underrated pleasures, too, notably the landscape of its Gargano peninsula and the souk-like qualities of its capital, Bari.

As for Sicily, the island is really a place apart, with a wide mixture of attractions ranging from some of the finest preserved Hellenistic treasures in Europe, to a couple of Italy’s most appealing Mediterranean beach resorts in Taormina and Cefalù, not to mention some gorgeous upland scenery.